Monday, July 24, 2006

State of the Nation

No, I didn't listen to the State of the Nation address. Mom initially wanted to, but we both got tired of waiting. By the time two o'clock came, we had both had enough of the commentary leading up to the address itself. Besides, (1) there wouldn't be any earth-shattering revelations; and (2) we could read about it in the papers tomorrow.

So the family went out to witness the true State of the Nation...at the Gaisano Mall. It's my last day in Davao, so why bother listening to hot air when I can see it for myself.

And what was there to see: students strolling around on a Monday afternoon, easing the worries of the day away. Many of them were in white, indicating a course of studies in the medical profession. Then there were the young folks glued to computer monitors on the cybercafes. No, they weren't blogging; they were plugging away at each other in Counterstrike or on some MMORPG. No, I won't offer any interpretations: that's just the way it is.


A funny thing, though: today's event made me think of an old song from the 80's, entitled -- you guessed it -- "State of the Nation" by a band called Industry. I looked up the lyrics, and found them especially poignant in relation to the OFWs in Lebanon.

I see them marching off to war
They're looking so heroic
I'm told they won't be gone for long
But that's a lie and they know it
Never to be seen again
Ten thousand gone they won't return

Strategic games is all we learn in the end
But they say:
Don't you worry about the situation
(A message from the telephone)
(I'm waiting a chance to come home)
They always have to fight the alienation
They out there fighting for the state of the nation
(I realize I'm fighting alone)
When nightmares memories fades to dust

We'll get back on our feet again
This war has nothing to do with us
But somehow we're still involved in it

Well...

Don't you worry about the situation
(A message from the telephone)
They out there fighting for the state of the nation
Well, Don't you worry about the situation
(I'm waiting a chance to come home)
(A message from the telephone)
They always have to fight the alienation
(I realize I'm fighting alone)

There's no place like home
There's no place I don't want to be anywhere else
There's no place like home

There's no place like home
There's no place like home
There's no place I don't want to be anywhere else
There's no place like home

There's no place like home
There's no place I don't want to be anywhere else

There's no place like home
There's no place I don't want to be anywhere
There's no place like home
Don't you worry about the situation

They out there fighting for the state of the nation

(A message from the telephone)
Don't you worry about the situation
They always have to fight the alienation
(I realize I'm fighting alone)

They out there fighting for the state of the nation
They always have to fight the alienation
(I'm waiting a chance to come home)

(I realize I'm fighting alone)
There's no place like home

There's no place like home
There's no place like home



5 comments:

  1. Hi Dom. Hope you got my email-ajay

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  2. The SONA reminded me more of 'Who Let The Dogs Out'.

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  3. SONA? what's that? he he

    I didn't listen either, I think it's just a waste of time. Sigh.

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  4. ooh, that song takes me back. Much better to listen to that than the SONA anyway. :)

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  5. CVJ: Ah, I have another song, then:

    Don't you love farce?
    My fault I fear,
    I thought that you'd want what I want,
    Sorry my dear
    But where are the clowns
    Send in the clowns
    Don't bother, they're here.

    That, of course, is from "Send in the Clowns."

    Thanks, too, Jairam and Chaz.

    ReplyDelete